Hoarder Fire in Endicott NY

b2ap3_thumbnail_Elyria-Hoarder-Fire-North-Coast-now-

Endicott, NY (WBNG Binghamton) Several fire departments responded to a second alarm house fire Tuesday morning.
The call came around 8:40 a.m. of reports of a house fire at 113 Roosevelt Ave.

Endicott woman hospitalized after fire http://www.pressconnects.com/story/news/2017/05/16/endicott-woman-hospitalized-after-fire/324571001/ via @pressconnects

Continue reading
3612 Hits
50 Comments

Podcast about Hoarder Fires

Guest Podcast Recorded with the folks from Firefighter Toolbox.  Listen in as David J Soler interviews Ryan Pennington on tips for fighting Hoarder Fires:

Show Notes:

Firefighter Toolbox.com


Hoarding has been becoming a growing concern in our communities.  How does this affect us  firefighters?  What does it matter?

Well, on this episode, I talk with Ryan Pennington, who has done a ton of research on the subject, and he tells us all about hoarding and how it affects us as firefighters and what we really need to know.  So many issues arise from hoarder fires and our tactics need to be adjusted because of the different dangers.  Get educated on them so you or your crews don’t get hurt.  This is something that can happen in any district.

This and  more.

Listen in Here

Continue reading
3582 Hits
41 Comments

New Welcome Video

Continue reading
2523 Hits
30 Comments

Ems Response to Hoarding: Locating the Victim

One type of call that Fire, EMS, and Law Enforcement often respond to is the

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="229"] Ems response to Hoarding


“check the well being” of a occupant that has not made contact with family in a certain amount of time.  Being called to check the well being of a person inside hoarding conditions can turn into a major incident it the responders enter ill prepared.  Let’s take a look inside the hoarding environment to offer some insight for first responders tasked with going inside them looking for people that have not been communicating with their friends, family, or others.

Ensuring Occupancy


Before we go inside the hoarding environment, exposing ourselves to different dangers, we should take steps to determine if the person is still living there.  Often, in hoarding conditions an occupant can fill their home until it is no longer inhabitable and just move out, that simple.  If the home has become so full the occupant will often disconnect the utilities, whether their choice or the building inspectors choice, and move to a different location.

If the call comes in to check on an occupant and you arrive to find a potential Heavy Content Environment we should take some steps to find out if the home is still occupied.

  • Have dispatch forward contact information to on scene responders for questioning

  • Question neighbors

  • Inspect utility meters

  • Perform a 380 degree size up

  • Look for access points (often NOT the front or back door)


Locating the Victim


Once the determination has been made that a person could be inside the hoarding it’s time

[caption id="attachment_883" align="alignright" width="200"]Hoarding Hoarding


to go looking for them.   Understanding that hoarding can take over a home and prohibit occupants from sleeping in bedrooms or sitting in living room can help lead you to their locations.  If you understand this complication we may start searching for occupants in different locations.

Example: Searching for an occupant after dark, we may start our search in the living room instead of the bedroom.

The best way of making access to trapped occupants will be to find their primary entrance points.  If the home has filled the space around “normal” access points, such as doorways, they will often enter through windows or other means.  Finding these entrances will be the best place to start looking for a missing person.

Using the only access points will lead you to the “goat paths” throughout the home.   These pathways can lead directly to the occupant.  Warning: using these pathways EMS providers should start a search pattern when looking for occupants and try to keep the belongings in place.  Keeping the debris from falling can be a difficult task as the pathways can be so narrow.

One way of making your travel through the pathways less destructive is to leave your bags outside the environment until the patient has been discovered.  Without our bags across our shoulders it will reduce or profile and keep from knocking the stacks over.  First responders should carry a small bag or the basic CPR mask just in case of impending need of CPR or rescue breathing.  Keeping the bags outside the building will also reduce the need for decontaminating them as well.

EMS providers should use a coordinated search pattern to find the victims, much like firefighters would.  Collapsed belongings could easily hide patients. Utilizing a primary and secondary search can help offer the occupant a larger chance of survival

Primary: Traveling the pathways looking for occupants quickly and efficiently.  The primary search should be a quick and organized search. 

Secondary: Secondary searches should be a slower search where individual piles of collapsed belongings that seem out of place or different should be inspected for occupants.

Review


Hoarding can present many challenges to first responders in all three divisions.  Before entering a hoarded environment you should ensure the potential for occupancy and use an accurate size up to locate the victim.  Finding people that are missing inside the massive amounts of belongings can turn a “routine” check the well being call into a technical rescue inside a Haz-Mat situation.

Start preparing for the call you will receive, not might receive.  Hoarding is found in everyone’s district and it is an area that we need to review.  Use this quick article for some thought stirring discussion and review your department’s policies on entering private residence on check the well being calls.
Continue reading
3316 Hits
71 Comments

Challenging Hoarder Fire Situation from California



From News10.net



SACRAMENTO, CA - A hoarder's home offered plenty of fuel when it went up in flames Wednesday night.

Neighbors said the woman who lives at the home on the 2000 block of 66th Avenue, off Florin Road, had made threats to set her house on fire previously. Police detained her in front of her burned out house, but it is still unclear what will happen to her.

The woman's pet dog didn't survive the fire.

When Sarah Urbina saw her neighbor's home on fire, she grabbed her garden hose and tried to help put out the flames. When she saw the woman who lives at the home outside, she asked her what happened.

"She was telling me that she was lighting a candle inside the garage 'cause she was cleaning it out," Urbina said

Chamber of Hoarders Learning points:

  • Dealing with the occupant can be dangerous

  • Hoarder Fire pose serious problems for the advancing Hose Teams

  • Be aware of the need for Police intervention

  • Protect the on scene personnel from dangers of interacting with occupants


 
Continue reading
1034 Hits
0 Comments

Hoarder Fires Size Up

Hoarder Fires


Welcome to the first video from the ChamberofHoarders.com.  This short video is a look into the new exciting online learning that will be released soon!  The Chamber of Hoarders Online Learning Center will be a 24/7 access to hoarding education for first responders.

Keep up to date on the new online learning center by signing up for our email blasts.
Click here to sign up.   We hope you enjoy our first video.

Continue reading
1388 Hits
0 Comments

Hoarder Fires Class:Coming Soon

[caption id="attachment_638" align="aligncenter" width="300"]Online learning is going to the next level Online learning is going to the next level
Continue reading
1070 Hits
7 Comments

Overhead View of Hoarder Homes

Without a doubt, the number one question asked is “How can I tell if the home is a Hoarder Home”.  The answer: You will need to look for the Cues and Clues of Clutter. If you are driving your district, running medical emergencies, or driving home from work you should be on the lookout for the hoarded homes in your district.  Knowing the conditions BEFORE a fire happens will make you better prepared when you arrive.  How do you find a hoarder home?  Let’s look and a new approach to identifying a clutter home in your district.

Street Level View

As we drive the streets in our districts we should be on the lookout for unique challenges.  These include a hoarder home and the potential for a response.  When driving past these homes you should be looking out for some typical cues:

  • Hoarded front yards

  • Large privacy fence covering back yard

  • Cluttered front porches

  • Blocked windows

  • Overgrown shrubs, bushes or trees

  • Multiple vehicles in yard that are full


These cues and clues should trigger a need for further investigation.  If you suspect one or more of the above you should begin to investigate a little deeper, but how?

[caption id="attachment_543" align="aligncenter" width="300"]Aerial view of a Cluttered House Aerial view of a Cluttered House


Overhead View

Without an invitation or a need we cannot enter your property but the eye in the sky always knows.  Taking to your computer and using tools such as Google earth can let you get a bird’s eye view of the property to confirm your suspicions.  Find a point of interest, address, or something to give you a reference point and view the property from overhead.  This perspective will allow you to view the backyard, side yard, and potentially the windows without physically walking the property.

 Read More about Pre-Fire Planning Here:

http://chamberofhoarders.com/3-things-your-department-should-do-about-hoarding/

 

Read more about Non-Fire Dangers in Hoarder Homes Here:

http://chamberofhoarders.com/hoarder-homes-more-dangers-than-fire/
Continue reading
3947 Hits
64 Comments
View Store

Online Training Store

Find our DVDs and downloadable training material online here.

Go to top